Friday, 20 November 2020

Port Arthur, Tasmania

Port Arthur is interesting in that it held the Convict Prison from 1833 to 1853.  The prison and buildings hold much history as it was a community.  I have posted a few photos in 2015 of Port Arthur none of which you see in this post.

When I passed my Nursing exam back then it was when you became a 'Sister' and wore a white veil which is no longer used.
 
My parents had given me a car for passing my exams so a friend whom I had nursed with set off on a holiday around Tasmania for a few weeks.  I was 19 at the time. When we returned I married my husband a few months later.
We slept in the car..lol, had saucepans, frypan, cultery, plates, kettle, towels and tea towels and some food such as veggies and meat.  In those days there were no coffee shops, eating places as there is today.  We went to corner shops and bought food to cook. Always had toilets and showers too.
Where ever we stayed there was always a fireplace, and water to cook our meals.  We went right around Tasmania and it's here in front of the jail below that we slept for 2 nights.  The grass was not mowed, the ruins very ruined, roads were not blocked off, entrance was free, one was free to roam all over the place, so different these days.
A map below shows you where Port Arthur is.  Way down south.

 



56 comments:

  1. Those old jails must have been awful places for the convicts. You probably had better conditions sleeping in your car.

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    1. Cold they would have been, and appalling conditions.
      The car was good to sleep in, very comfortable from memory. I received a Christmas from my friend who was with me today, she's always early and lives in another city.

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  2. The prison building looks quite frightening.

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    1. It is and interesting going through it, a beautiful view of the sea though.

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  3. I've never seen a prison that big. I wonder if anyone escaped from there, it looks secluded so that would make it hard to get somewhere.

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    1. Yes there were escapees, one by the name of Martin Cash he escaped twice I believe.Martin swan across Eaglehawk Neck which is on the map.
      Martin was a notorious bushranger and had a son called Martin.

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  4. Port Arthur carries some dreadful history doesn't it (some more recent than others). I am glad that you had those few days to wander around and enjoy it. I remember those car trips well. Our family holidays were similar - though we had a tent rather than sleeping in the car. Bathrooms were rare though.

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    1. I had relatives along the way on that trip so called into them for a visit, most of them I'd stayed with when a child in school holidays whilst my parents worked. That way an eye was kept on us.
      Shocking history and cruelty back then.

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  5. Llevas ya muchos años viajando y conociendo muy bien tu país. Ahora de esa cárcel, no quedan nada más que las paredes de pie.

    Besos

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    1. Yes, travelling for years, within Tasmania so many times because my father was transferred to cities and towns to work as a Policeman, so therefore always exploring the areas.
      I'm pleased Port Arthur Convict prison was restored as much as it is.

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  6. It sounds like you may have needed a trailer to carry your kitchen equipment with you. How interesting it must have to see Port Arthur before it was really set up for tourism.

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    1. So very different back then and it is now Andrew. Lucky to have been there many times for free, family picnics were held there, bagpipes played and so on..great times.
      All fitted well in the boot, just the matter of packing it right :)

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  7. I can't fathom out why such an infamous place is a tourist attraction!
    Colin

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  8. Goodness me, it does look a very large prison.

    All the best Jan

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    1. It was rather big, a lot of convicts lived there in the 1800's.

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  9. I have been there back in the days when I could walk and there was a lot of walking done

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  10. I found Port Arthur a very depressing place, even when I visited there with my parents as a teenager, probably around the time you were visiting with your friend. I went back there after the Port Arthur massacre and found it just as depressing but still very interesting and unfortunately a part of our history.

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    1. I have heard of many people feeling depressed and very sad when visiting Port Arthur, for me I never felt that way, can understand why people felt and feel like you do about the place as it wasn't a happy place at all.

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    2. Having trouble commenting on your blog Rosie - won't let me.
      Will try tomorrow it might then.

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  11. I like the restoration-- It has a beauty that masks its past.

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  12. Muy buenos recuerdos tienes de esos años y con qué poco viajábamos. Muy distinto es todo ahora amiga. Es enorme.
    Buen viernes Margaret. Cuídate.
    Un abrazo.

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  13. Interesting, I imagine that beautiful memories of that trip, experiences, past time.
    Greetings

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  14. Hello Margaret,
    Very impressive pictures. Very special to see this prison.

    Greetings, Marco

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  15. Bien captado ese edificio que nos lleva a otros tiempos sombrios

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  16. The beautiful and magnificent building of this convict prison from 1833 to 1853 ... seems haunted.
    But it's also beautiful to look at in each room.

    Greetings.

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  17. Nice photos. The ruins is a sad reminder that it was a prison. The surrounding is a beautiful place.

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    1. The prison was built on a beautiful setting back then.
      It's a sad place really.

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  18. You have lovely memories.
    Interesting place, and nice photos.
    Hugs

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  19. A dark, heavy cloud of sadness lingers over Port Arthur...so much history...old and relatively new.

    Have a good week, Margaret... :)

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    1. Yes, very old history of torture as so on, then those shootings in the cafe, dreadful.

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  20. It has been spruced up for tourists. I don't think you would be sleeping in the car there now.It is a eerie place to visit. The history, old and new seems to creep into you when you visit.

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    1. No sleeping there these days Diane, not permitted to take cars there only to the car park, then pay..very different to when I went there to sleep and take a peek around.
      It's a moving place these days now that's it is so different.

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  21. Quite an adventure, Margaret!! Those were the days... : )

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  22. You had a great time by the car travel carrying foods. Inconvenience is not depressing but devising. It brings good memories.

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    1. Carrying food and sleeping in the car was a wonderful adventure, we met many people along the way..So lucky.

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  23. Beautiful journey you made, I used too go around the British Isles.

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  24. Replies
    1. It is a big one and takes a long time to walk around it too.

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  25. The building looks gigantic and good pictures and memories

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    1. It is a large building Steve, certainly good memories and thank re photos.

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  26. How many good memories, it must have been an excellent and fun holiday.
    Extraordinary looks from an imposing place that was certainly a very fearful and scary prison.
    Hugs

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    1. Certainly not a nice place to be back then, no privledges as there is today in some prisions.

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  27. i really enjoyed story of your newly married two nights there :)
    i could see the serenity and charm of that time the place had then
    glimpses of prison building are lovely at first sight unless one feels the terror belong to world inside

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