Monday, 27 January 2020

Burdekin Bridge, Queensland

After staying nearly a week in Mackay we headed further north to Ayr to get warm.  The tropics are not always warm in the dead of winter.

The bridge is part of the Highway.
The Burdekin Bridge spans the Burdekin River between the towns of Ayr and Home Hill, Queensland, Australia. Located on the Bruce Highway which is part of Highway 1, it is an important link in the national road network.

Originally, it was thought that the bridge could not be built in its present location. No trace of rock could be found on which to build the bridge foundations. In 1946, two high-ranking Government engineers visited India to inspect a number of bridges built on sand foundations. The same technique was used for the Burdekin Bridge and it is the only bridge in  The bridge rests on 11 huge, hollow, concrete caissons sunk into the river bed. The caissons are 17 metres across the top (measured parallel to the stream) and vary in width from 5.5 to 7.6 metres. The caissons were sunk into the river bed to a depth of about 30 metres. Add to that the approximately 20 metres that the caissons rise above the bed and the end result is some very massive pieces of concrete. Each weighs about 4,000 tons. The caissons were fitted with steel "cutting edges" to help them sink. The steel used in the cutting edges weighed 238 tons.
Wikipedia




Where we were parked in the Caravan Park at Ayr, Queensland.
It's hard to believe that we travelled a long way to get warm in winter last year.
Everywhere was cold expect at Ayr, but on the way home it was warm in most places.

47 comments:

  1. I am sure that your concept of warm is totally different from mine!

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  2. The bridge is pretty impressive and what a nice area to explore.
    Have a wonderful day.

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  3. What is the bird in the last photo? We don’t have those in the US!

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    1. The Ibis birds are a real pest in Brisbane - they virtually took over the Botanic gardens. The Council hires a hawk trainer to move them from the main shopping precinct of the city and the parks......works while the handler is there! As soon as he goes back come the "Pooping Machines".
      They are way down the bottom with the murderous Indian Mynah birds on my list.
      Colin

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  4. I was sure that I had commented - but it seems not.
    That bridge is an incredible piece of architecture, and how wonderful that it is still standing and still in use.

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    1. It sure is one of the best bridges made from steel that we have seen in Australia. Amazing the work that went into it from the beginning to the end.
      Sometimes I comment and for some weird reason it doesn't publish, so then have to do it again :)

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    1. Fabulous bridge Jo-Anne certainly agree with you on that.
      Thanks.

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  6. While your home state has some terrific masonry bridges, I love the NSW and QLD steel bridges. Bruce Highway looks rather quiet.

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    1. We do have some beautiful bridges Andrew in our State but always good to travel on steel ones too, for us they are different to ours.
      Was quiet on the highway.

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  7. Very interesting Burdekin Bridge information. I'm not so keen on the Ibis, but they are everywhere here too, making a nuisance if having a picnic somewhere.

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    1. Those Ibis are always on the lookout for food. Lucky that one was not too interested in me.

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  8. Toda una belleza de imagenes. Buen trabajo, amiga
    Un abrazo

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  9. Very impressive and strong bridge. Nice park and bird.

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    1. It's a masterpiece that bridge and should stand for many years to come.

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  10. The ibis looks as though he should be on an Egyptian wall... Another nice post!

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  11. Steadfast bridge, and what a Ibis, beautiful.

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    1. They are a nice bird but probably not to the locals, I'm not used to seeing them but locals are.

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  12. Un puente muy interesante. El ibis me gusta, en España no lo tenemos. Besos.

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    1. Good strong bridge, and fancy not having the ibis in Spain...but then you have birds that we don't have, makes sense.

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  13. Muy interesante ese puente de hierro, del que has realizado una magnífica toma.

    Besos

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  14. I do like a good steel structure bridge but then I am from Sydney.
    Merle..............

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  15. It's been ages since I've driven over that bridge.

    I can still remember the thrill I felt the first time I did so, which wasn't until around 1981.

    That bridge was such an icon during my childhood years. As children, we learned so much about it at school. It was such a huge thing...a massive achievement.

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    1. Sure was a massive achievement Lee, and I get a thrill having the pleasure of going over it too, it's a great bridge.
      It's good that you were taught about the bridge as school for so many things about our country is not taught these days.

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  16. That is a super looking bridge. Nice park too.

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  17. wow this bridge is magnificent :)
    enjoyed story of it ,how nice to visiting India for inspiration

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  18. That really is a great looking bridge.
    Nice to see that bird too, I checked on your other comments to discover it's an Australian white Ibis :)

    All the best Jan

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    1. Yes that's right, an Ibis I should have said in the beginning.
      Great bridge.

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