Wednesday, 26 August 2020

Lake Godon, Tasmania.

After viewing  Lake Pedder in March 2020 we headed around to the Gorden Dam in this remote area of in the South West of Tasmania.  It was raining as one expects it to there.  We last visited in 2014.

A little information on Lake Gordon.
Lake Gordon is a reservoir created by the Gordon Dam on the upper reaches of the Gordon River in south-west Tasmania, Australia. The reservoir was formed in the early 1970s as a result of the dam construction by the HEC. (Hydro Electric Commission) It was the largest and most controversial hydro-electric power scheme in Tasmania.

Lake Gordon has a surface area of 272 km2 (105 sq mi), with storage capacity of 12.5 km3 (3.0 cu mi) of water, the equivalent of twenty-five times the amount of water in Port Jackson. (Sydney Harbour).
Lake Pedder is connected to Lake Gordon through the McPartlans Pass Canal.

 The scenery like below is all around you.





There are 196 steps down to side of the hill to be able to walk across the dam which is wider than it looks, we didn't do it this time due to rain, but don't think I could do it now I'm older.


Below is Seesaw Mountain, not listed on the maps of today. Taken on our way back to New Norkfolk.



 

43 comments:

  1. Witaj piękne widoki zachwycam się nimi, serdecznie Cię pozdrawiam.

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  2. La vista de esos paisajes son impresionantes y además se le une la belleza del lago.

    Besos

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  3. Dramatic scenery and one huge dam. I am not certain I could do that walk either - but would probably try.

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    1. Well I did do it some years back, last visit but certainly can't do it anymore...it's a long way down.

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  4. A huge dam, the scenery is amazing.

    All the best Jan

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  5. It is certainly an impressive dam wall. Damming these rivers was very controversial at the time, but I wonder if there is any real environmental harm, aside from during the construction and initial flooding.

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    1. All seems well there now Andrew, no one talks about the damage much anymore for they can probably see the benefit of it now.
      Was a greatly controversial way back before they built it and even as they were building, people strapping themselves to the trees and so on. However now it's just beautiful.

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  6. My goodness! What a magnificent landscape.

    And the dam has shared its benefits since its construction, and will continue doing so for decades to come.

    Wonderful images, Margaret...best wishes. :)

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    1. Thanks Lee.
      We here in Tasmania have a heap of dams, not that many accessible by they public though as they are up in the mountains.

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  7. Impressive construction but I think when being built it was the source of some
    political football match!!!!
    Colin

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    1. Dreadful going ons way back before it was built and so on, but it's beautiful now and at least people can see it as there is a good viewing platform now.

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  8. Beautiful scenery Margaret and thank you so much for sharing your super photos and that map. All very interesting.

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  9. A fine dam makes a fine lake. A most interesting post.

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  10. Me encanta visitar estas magníficas construcciones Margaret.Non damos cuenta de lo impresionantes y necesarias que son. Estupendas fotos.
    Buen miércoles. Cuídate.
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Thanks Laura, it's nice to see you enjoy looking :)
      Take care.

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  11. Dams have marred the landscape and deleteriously affected the environment around the world. In North America many are being decommissioned and dismantled.

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    1. Oh are they, can't see that happening here. We sell hydro power to the State of Victoria and of course we have enough for the Island as well.

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    2. Well dams are here to stay in Australia.
      Maybe you haven't heard - but Australia is the driest continent in the World,
      but we are not devoid of intelligence when it comes water support for irrigation and power resources.
      Colin

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  12. Beautiful scenery. Just looking down at the steep steps turns my legs into jelly.

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    1. Nancy have to agree with you on jelly legs :) when younger for me my legs were good.

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  13. Oh My, How I Would Love To Be There Right Now

    Cheers

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    1. Great place for you to explore, actually many places here on the Island for you.

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  14. Replies
    1. Agree with you Anita, it's why so many people love to visit Tasmania and travel around and through the Island and some even come here to live.

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  15. Like you, Margaret, I would have been hesitant to walk down those stairs in the rain, but worse yet would you have to walk back up them. The views from the top were simple amazing even on an overcast day, maybe more so.

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    1. Adds more mystery on a rainy day and those steps are steep.

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  16. Un paisaje precioso para recorrer. Besos.

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  17. incredibly beautiful place :)

    i thoroughly LOVED these magnificent photos dear Margaret ,how amazing to create steps for visitors ,being close to large amount of water must be soothing though you could not go there due to rain still i bet you found this unforgettable

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