Monday, 14 December 2020

Campbell Town, Tasmania

Campbell Town is about 70km south of Launceston Tasmania.  It's a nice place to stop and have a rest when driving to Hobart.  Campbell Town offers  coffee shops, grocery store a park, a pub and nick knacks along with a few other things.  Population is about 750 to 800 people and is a friendly rural town with farming being the main business in the area.  My 2nd great grandfather coming as a free settler in 1854 from Kilkenny, Ireland with his wife and a few children to live in a place behind Campbell Town called Isis River which is in fact just a river and a farm or two.  2nd great grandfather grew potatoes in this area and extended his family, but not satisfied with his crops he moved to Tunnack, Tasmania further south east where he remained until his death in 1880.

I've shown photos of the Red Bridge the oldest used bridge on a the National Highway in Australia built by convicts.  (These photos of the bridge I've never shown)
It took convict 15 months between 1836-38 to build and the bricks were made of clay. The bridge goes over the Elizabeth River.






39 comments:

  1. Nice Pictures wishing you and family happy holidays and merry Christmas in advance.

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  2. They built to last didn't they. Another lovely series - and I do like that sculpture.

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    1. Gorgeous sculptures on that old tree, I remember there were several trees there years ago and people used to sit under them but guess they became dangerous. Beautiful old bridge and the convicts sure knew how to build a bridge.

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  3. Nice place Margaret!Also beautiful new header!

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  4. Es bonito el puente rojo y además he visto otro, que luce bastante bien.

    Besos

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    1. It is a beautiful bridge - and it's nice you found another too..

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  5. Hello Margaret,
    What a nice pictures with the bridges.
    And great to see that artwork of figures of the old tree. Fantastic.

    Greetings, Marco

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  6. The sculpture is quite amazing. I love those bridges, the second one looks old. Nice composition of your photos. Have a wonderful new week.

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    1. Thanks :) Always good to have a frame if you can find one when taking photos.

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  7. Interesting sculpture carved from those huge old trees. Is there a story?

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    1. Yes there is a story attached to the carvings.

      'Carved from three trees by Eddie Freeman from Ross these unusual sculptures depict the history of the town. The first tree depicts a British soldier guarding a convict labourer during the construction of the Red Bridge. Below is a carving of the bushranger, Martin Cash.'

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  8. I remember taking photos of chainsaw carved sculptures in that area and it must have at Campbell Town. They are very well done.

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    1. Yes it would have been Campbell Town there are some at Ledgerwood and a few other places. They are well done.

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  9. Campbell Town sounds like a great place to stop and browse around on a journey. Interesting to learn of your great grandfathers, and some of the town’s history. The Red Bridge is a work of art and sometimes these structures also tell a story. And talking about works of art, those sculptures are amazing. Very enjoyable photos Margaret, and interesting history. Thanks so much!

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    1. You are welcome Denise. A lot of history in and around Campbell Town.

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  10. The penal colonies really did have an integral role in the development of Tasmania, and the evidence is all around.

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    1. That's true, especially down the midlands, Launceston and Hobart.

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  11. Interesting Irish ancestry. My Irish side came out as
    "FLEEING" Free immigrants due to the Potato Famine.
    They successfully went in the Tavern trade - and then
    hotels and onto the land especially around the Crockwell/Bowral
    area. Certainly not anything to do with Potatoes - ha ha!

    The workmanship on those bridges by the convicts is a credit - I guess
    the "POMS" loss was the AUSSIE gain.
    So for stealing a bloody rabbit from the landed gentry turned out as
    our gain for our works of art in opening a new country.
    Great blog report and photos Margaret.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Yes England sent out to Australia some very good tradesman back then, and a lot of them were free settlers as well.
      Oh yes they were sent out to Australia the main of the convicts for doing nothing totally wrong, the Governments want to fill Australia up with people.
      Thanks.

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  12. They built things to last in those days. Love the tree sculpture too.

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    1. They sure did Diane and luckily people haven't pulled that bridge and others down - would be an awful pity if they had of done that.

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  13. The red bridge is beautiful. I have an interest in bridges which is developing and I think I might start to photograph more of them. Tassie seems to have quite a few very lovely ones too, might have something to do with being a penal colony unlike South Australia.

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    1. Yes I guess you are correct as convicts built the two bridges I've shown lately.
      I'm always interested in bridges, in latter years they are often replaced and it's good to look at photos of the older ones.

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  14. The bridge and the sculpture are both beautiful. Have a wonderful new week.

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  15. Interesante Margaret, me encantó el puente. Muchos besos.

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  16. Beautiful photos, especially the one with the view of the red bridge makes a huge impression!
    Greetings

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  17. Dig That First Photo But The Second Shot Left Me Speechless

    Cheers

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  18. Yes--- That bridge is very impressive. Lately I've been feeling that it is important to let my blogging friends know how important both their posts and their comments are to me. I hope your Christmas is good!

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  19. I really like this little stone bridge and these sculptures. There is a softness that emerges from these landscapes which is very attractive.

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