Friday, 18 May 2018

A bit of Woolmers Estate.

On our visit to Woolmers Estate near Longford here in Tasmania took some photos of the area.
Woolmers Estate is a farming one and was founded in 1817 by a grazier and member of parliament Thomas Archer.

A farm house on the property.  There is a rose garden, accommodation, restaurant for the guests. I'm not sure where the accommodation is! However there is a website [ here ]



A house on the property.


This cottage is the Gardner's Cottage.


The pump house.


Interesting fence, have seen a few of these in Tasmania.


The chooks that roam from the Estate came to greet me.


A new bridge below the estate.


35 comments:

  1. I think those fences have their origin in Britain where it is called hedge laying, and they still have hedge laying competitions at ploughing matches.

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    1. Thanks David for the information as I didn't have a clue as to what that type of fence was called..

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  2. Replies
    1. It is lovely and there is another not too far from the one I've shown, but they are not as friendly for us to visit :)

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  3. David is right that is called a laid hedge - it is a very old traditional skill.
    The hens have a rather interesting appearance.

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    1. Thanks Rosemary, didn't know the name of that type of fence.
      The property is from back in the 1800's, so that fence was appropriate for that time.
      The hens do look different to the other kind we see..

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  4. The fence is interesting. I have seen them but I am not sure where.

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    1. Not always easy to remember where you saw the fence, there are a few in Tasmania and I couldn't tell you where I saw them exactly except for a couple.

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  5. I have also seen similar fences - and am racking both brain cells to remember where.
    Interesting that politicians so often also have time to farm. Then and now.

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    1. The Archer would have had staff to do his work, then that permitted him to wander off to be a Politician.
      There is another fence at Clarendeon House at Evandale that has the same type of fence, and from memory my grandfather had such a fence and he lived in the midlands of Tasmania.

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  6. en los viajes no puede faltar una cámara, para ir recogiendo imágenes de los lugares que más te han encantado. A través de ella vivirás los recuerdos y las emociones que sentías al pasar por ese lugar.

    Besos

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    1. Always I try to take the camera as you never know what you might see and in people, scene and it's always wonderful to have a memory of it in a photo.

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  7. Looks like an estate of one of the "Squattocracy" a la the Downers of SA.
    Quite impressive and really politicans of all persuasions do have a right to have
    some other income/living to fall back on when they are voted out.

    Having when a young kid show chooks I am fascinated at the breeding of those two roosters - they appear to be some breed or more likely mixed breed of bantams.
    Interesting post.
    Colin

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    1. Well did you show your chooks, never would have thought that, learn something new everyday..

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    2. Yes - Old English Red Black Bantams and I won some first prizes!!

      I thought I had told you about my hens in PNG - I got day old chicks sent up from Brisbane....took two days to arrive at Finschaffen and all survived........then I put them under a "kanaka" little broody hen
      who did the excellent job of mothering them. I got Rhode Island Red
      pullet chickens......at one stage I had 70 laying hens.
      Eggs coming by plane into outstations mostly arrived scrambled - ha ha
      Quite the little entrepreneur of the fresh egg industry.
      Cheers
      Colin

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  8. I saw on Landline a while ago that there are 2 professional hedge-layers in Vic who create new, and maintain old hedge fences/boundaries.
    That gardeners cottage reminds me of a wee gatehouse!
    Those chooks aren't 5 toed by any chance?
    They'd be the infamous 5 toed Dorking chook.

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    1. Gosh, never heard of a 5 toed Dorking chook, must look that up..
      From England the Archer's came so I expect they made it look like a part of an English farm..

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  9. lovely photos and an interesting fence. not much would get through it by the look.

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    1. I doubt anything would get through that fence, when the leaves come back on it, it will be very dense.

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  10. The Gardener's Cottage is very pretty, like a gingerbread house :)

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  11. An interesting place to visit. Nice pic of your grand daughter. They sure keep you busy.(last post)

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    1. Apparently it's very lovely when the roses are all out in late spring..
      Yes, usually kept busy..and thanks.

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  12. Muy bellas escenas e imagenes, amiga... Plenas de vida
    Un saludo

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  13. Beautiful place.
    great shots.
    Have a happy weekend
    Greetings from Portugal
    Maria
    Divagar Sobre Tudo um Pouco

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  14. I would not mind having that cottage. The fence is different from any other fence I have seen so far.
    :)

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  15. It’s a sweet cottage for sure. Several of those fences around the older farms..

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