Monday, 16 October 2017

Euroa, Victoria

We so liked Euroa in Victoria where we stayed for a couple of nights.
Walking down the street with camera in hand a man stopped us it turned out he was one of the Councillors of the town.  Great talking to him with all his knowledge of the town.

Major T.L. Mitchell camped on the banks of the Seven Creeks at Euroa during his 1836 "Australia Felix" expedition.  The Major Mitchell Parrots are named after him.

Euroa's claim to fame is that the National Bank was robbed by Ned Kelly (notorious bush ranger) in 1878. Much of the region's wealth once came from sheep but now it comes from horse studs.


The Euroa Hotel was built without the verandah by George Sutherland in 1884 in Railway Street. The style is an adaptation of Queen Anne work suitable for a country hotel, the architects being the then well-known to Euroa Tappin, Gilbert and Dennehy. C.L. Boos’s weatherboard North Eastern Hotel was previously on the same site. The new brick building was claimed to be the best of its kind outside Melbourne. It is an important part of the group of red-brick building facing the railways in this part of the town. Taken from Heritage - Euroa






This building was the residence of the Pharmacist years ago with his Chemist shop attached.






Part of the main street.


The above building is a Nursery, one would think they would fix the old building.


The sign on the Heritage walk and the newer building below where the old bank was that was robbed by Ned Kelly.


34 comments:

  1. How wonderful to visit that beautiful place whit you, dear friend !!
    Fantastic pics !!
    Have a happy Sunday !!

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  2. I am loving this trip. Beautiful buildings except the nursery. : )

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    1. Thanks Catarina.
      Yes the nursery looks like it's going to fall down before too many years pass, but if the roof was repaired, painted as well as the outside it would fit in rather well.

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  3. Buen encuentro para conocer, de primera mano, la historia de la ciudad.

    En tus buenas tomas, descubrimos sus buenos lugares.

    Besos

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    1. Thanks and hopefully I show you all good places that we've visited.

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  4. How good to meet a town Councillor, I'm sure you learnt a lot from him about the town.
    Enjoying all of your photographs ... such an amazing trip.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Hello Jan - thanks.
      Certainly did learn a lot, often locals are good on the history and what's happening.

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  5. I've always thought of the town has hot, dry and dusty. It seems it is well worth visiting.

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    1. I presume it's hot in summer and certainly cold in winter.
      All roads around the town and streets were sealed.
      Certainly if you get the opportunity it's a pleasant town to visit.

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  6. Schöne Bilder von der Stadt und ein interessanter Bericht.

    Noke

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  7. Some lovely buildings and how nice to meet an knowledgeable councillor who was happy to share.

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    1. Well the councillor was a lovely man and he came from Tasmania! Things you find out as you talk :)

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  8. A charming town! Here we have a zillion "Railroad Streets" and "Front Streets". Of course it's "Railway" there. Once again, I love exploring the architecture of small town Australia. Thanks!

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    1. Interesting the names of streets in some towns.
      You are welcome and thanks to you also.

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  9. Oh what a nice town, with some really nice buildings liked all the photos

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    1. Thanks Jo-Anne, it's one of the nicest towns to visit and stay.

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  10. hi M, i must admit that i've never heard of euroa but thanks to your beautiful post i'm glad that i have now. that's a claim to fame isn't it being robbed by ned kelly? i love the architecture of these country towns and i'm pleased to see that in the main they are looked after and appreciated. i'm looking forward to your posts as they are always interesting and readable. i hope you are well

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    1. Thank F.
      Most towns we visit are clean and tidy, makes for a much pleasant stay when people care about their surroundings - it's pride in their town.
      The famous Ned Kelly!

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  11. That's wonderful.. Love the Pharmacist's house..

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  12. Love the red brick hotel and the chemists building. These old towns preserve history better than the big cities. The old run down nursery had a certain charm about it.

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    1. Old towns are lovely, I expect they keep their buildings looking in near top condition as it's a tourist attraction with history.
      At first we didn't know a nursery was there until we walked back down past it. Rather cute even though that building needs work.

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  13. The town has such a great collection of buildings. The pharmacist must have done well to own such a house.

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    1. Must have done way back then, and probably the only chemist/pharmacist around for miles.

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  14. Hello Margaret,
    That's a wonderful hotel. Great style of that building.
    Nice shots!!

    Best regards,
    Marco

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  15. I missed this somehow last Monday, but I'm glad I found it today. That Hotel and the Pharmacists building are very, very, nice. I am glad they added a verandah to the Hotel though. Perhaps the nursery has only recently taken up residence in that building and will renovate as time and funds allow?

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    1. I miss posts sometimes and wonder how.
      The house looks beautiful in reality because everything around it is not as nice.
      Hopefully in time the Nursery people will do the building up as it would look good.

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