Thursday, 9 April 2015

Fingal, Tasmania, Australia

Fingal was founded in 1827 as a convict station and is approx. 232m above sea level, with a population of 366 people...so another small town along the highway to the East Coast of the Island.

By the time we reach Fingal on Easter Saturday is was raining...Fingal is noted these days for The World Coal Shovelling Championship.

There is coal in the area and I presume that it's mined, as I haven't heard anything to the contrary. A Company applied to open a new mine but there were people protesting regarding that.  It was peaceful and I don't recall it being on the news.

Below is the Post Office just an office in the front of a house.  I expect the 'first' post office is gone.




St. Peter's Catholic Church.


The back of the church - needless to say I took these from the vehicle as I didn't wish to get wet.


This building houses a small food store on the main highway.

20 comments:

  1. Margaret in Poland a small town is a place where there are over 5000 people. The church looks nice and so old.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh really about the population....we have many small town with only a few people in the area....I expect once the population would have been larger in Fingal when the coal mine was in full swing.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. I suppose it was built in the early to mid 1800's...I didnt see a stone that said when it was built..

      Delete
  3. Well at least for a small country town still has a post office.
    In many Australian small country towns - Fingal size - the Post Office
    was always attached to the Post Master's home - the home was behind
    the office which like as shown at Fingal faced the street.
    I've always considered this the "norm" rather than the unusual.
    You can bet your house on it that there was never a separate post
    office at Fingal!
    I suppose like all country town churches that this catholic one was shut
    and comes under the administration with other churches in the area of
    one priest from the largest town in the area?
    I dunno - how come all these Tassie country towns/hamlets/villages are all so
    pristine clean???
    Pity this cleanliness didn't extend to the mainland.
    Cheers
    Colin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are correct about the post offices and the churches these days....'clean' most town are thankfully. I always say that the remainder of Australian small town are usually clean also, that's how it was when we travelled, this year we will see again...

      Delete
    2. Oh no - I don't mean mainland small towns of Findal size are not well kept.
      But all the towns that you have shown are just incredible.
      But compared to I guess the old English style buildings, the Tasmanian ones just appear
      so different.

      Delete
    3. Oh ok...The building here are different to ones I have seen on the big island :) Sydney first, then Hobart, then Launceston with Melbourne to follow as in cities....

      Delete
  4. Loved your photos today. The church is so beautiful and probably even more so in the rain. The post office is very unique, and how handy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. The church does look solid and let's hope it does last many years and also used..
      We have lots of houses in the vain of the post office..

      Delete
  5. I like small towns, have always said I would live in a small town if I had all my family with me

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Small towns seem to be friendly...though we didn't see a anyone around....that would be nice a town for a family...

      Delete
  6. That church looks so solid that it could last a good few centuries.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The church is beautiful. It must have taken a lot of work to lay it out in stones like that. A coal shoveling contest?

    ReplyDelete
  8. The men that would have built the church would have been experts in their field.
    Yes a coal shovelling contest...interesting, haven't seen it done but it would be fun and competive for those that do it..

    ReplyDelete
  9. The church is lovely. If it's ever "retired from service", it would make a wonderful home if it was converted with expertise and style. It happens a lot in the UK primarily as many towns or villages have multiple churches which are no longer required.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think the church is used much at all these days. I was wondering what it looks like inside but of course it was locked.
      What you mentioned is done down here, so many churches made into a home, and they look alright.

      Delete
  10. I love this series, thanks for sharing. I enjoy seeing churches, stores, restaurants and scenes in other parts of the world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's nice. I like seeing other countries too.

      Delete