Friday, 28 April 2017

Interesting at Rockhampton, Queensland

In winter 2016 a drive to Nerimbera not very far from Rockhampton city is St Christophers Chapel at Nerimbera. The Chapel was erected in 1943 by the American 542 Engineers, Ship and Shore Battalion.  The timber and stone chapel was built on Harbour Board land made available to the U.S, Army by the Queensland Government.  It reflects the presence of American troops in Queensland during the Second World War and stands as the only structure of it's kind in Australia.

The area around the chapel has been used as a convalescent camp for American troops based around Rockhampton to rest after combat operations in the Pacific Islands.  During the peak time of American occupation more than 70,000 American soldiers from the 24th, 32nd and 41st U.S Army combat divisions, and One Army Corps - "1Corps", were stationed in the Rockhampton area.
Wikipedia

The church was used for all denominations at that time and still is when every year a church service is held on the nearest Sunday to July 4.

More about St. Christophers Chapel is [ here ]

Not that many Australians or Americans realize or know about St. Christopers Chapel.








The Altar above and below the view from one of the sides.  No windows to let the breeze in on hot days.




30 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. It is simple, but it was war time and for the heat of the tropics.

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  2. Definitely new to me. Thank you. And I love the wall-less state. Practical - and symbolic as well.

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    1. Interesting what we find out by following a blog, then I found out by travelling. A nice chapel and I'm pleased it's still used once in awhile.

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  3. I do like this open air chapel. It is simple but very nice.

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    1. It's lovely to visit this special place, and on the boards near the roof are names of those who ran races, they had their own Olympics I believe.

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  4. Yes. I've visited there - a long time ago...back in the mid-60s.

    Nana and Mum used to tell my brother and me about it when we were kids. My grandparent's home in Rockhampton had an air raid shelter in the backyard. It was big enough to hold one of their neighbouring families as well.

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    1. That was a good idea to have a shelter, and not many people realize what it was like up that way in the War, I know I didn't until I was up that way.

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  5. Quite a find. Thank you for the background and the look around.

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  6. Love to know the history.. great post..

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    1. I always like to know a bit about the history of a p lace that I visit.

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  7. An open air chapel! I've only ever seen those in movies about Hawaii and other island nations.
    I like it, it has a peaceful look to it.

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    1. I had never seen one till this one, never even thought of a chapel not having any sides etc. The history is amazing to me.

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  8. Replies
    1. It is and not that many know about it, especially the history.

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  9. It is striking, the small chapel, for its great simplicity.

    Kisses

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    Replies
    1. Built in times of trouble to the best of their ability.

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  10. Most of the churches in Papua New Guinea were open air or next to being open air
    places of worship. I have noted similar churches with open air walls - some have pulleys to pull protective walls up in storm times in New Caledonia, Bali, Thailand and Guam. Very sensible, I think.
    Sitting in a walled in church in the tropics would test your praying ability.
    Even in Brisbane during the sweltering humid summer months, St. Stephens Catholic
    Cathedral has all the side doors wide open and the overhead fans going 50 to the dozen!
    If not the praying congregation would be in a lather and praying that the priest would get a move on - ha ha.
    Colin

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    1. :) Colin. I can only imagine what it would be like in church on such days.

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  11. Glad to the site has been preserved. The upkeep is impressive.

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    1. I'm pleased it is preserved as well, because it teaches me and others the involvement the USA had in the War. It's all history.

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  12. The chapel just suits for the climate. This place knows the history.
    Thanks for visiting my blog.

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    Replies
    1. Yes it does know history and if those walls could talk :)

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