Friday, 13 February 2015

Ingham, Queensland.

Ingham is 110 klm (68) ml north of Townsville which I featured in my previous post. It's 1,437 klm (893 mi) north of the state capital, Brisbane.
At Ingham sugarcane is grown, it has the largest sugar-mill in Australia and one of the largest in the Southern Hemisphere.

Many Italians live in Ingham so the Australian- Italian Festival is held in May each year with thousands of people attending the event.  The town is known as "Little Italy".


A field where the cane is grown.




 A field of cane growing across the from the Graveyard.


 Some of the Italian graves.






25 comments:

  1. Those are some beautiful and ornate gravestones, for sure! Amazing structures.

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    1. I was about to say the same thing, looks a great tribute to a departed family member

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    2. Adam, there are photos inside of the people who are in the graves, and rather large photos in a frame of some of them, not all.

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  2. I love watching graveyards. Italian graves are very rich but As I know they built so big and impressive graves intheir country.... It is great to see a field of cane..

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    1. It's amazing how much money is spend on these graves, but that's how the Italians do it.

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  3. Cemeteries - not really a visiting place on my radar gun. I do like visiting War Cemeteries which are always
    maintained as befitting in a pristine state. Plus they are all lawn and egalitarian and I am sure that is correct. I doubt whether a General is more important in the eyes of the Lord than a Private?

    Watching a sugar cane field being "fired" sure is a sight to witness. Did you, Margaret, manage to see one being conducted.?

    Margaret, you are giving an excellent travelling tour of Australia for your overseas readers and I suppose
    some Aussie "stay at homers" also. Keep up the good work of your travels.
    Colin
    (PS: I think with the graveyard /tombstone theme of this, I will dispense with my usual "Cheers")

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    1. Warm cemeteries sometimes we visit when travelling. There are a few lovely ones in our country.
      I don't think God would mind :)
      Have not seem the cane alight as yet, probably we travel at the wrong time of your for that.
      Thanks for your compliment :) We will go again to the big island in midwinter...

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  4. Italians certainly go all out with their graves.

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  5. The graveyard is interesting. I guess that is the Italian influence from their homeland.

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  6. Lovely photos and I like how the tree almost makes a "frame" in your third photo.

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    1. Thanks Linda, The tree does look ok, it frames the photo.

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  7. I'm always quite astounded when I see photos of lesser known or visited areas of Australia, such as far northern Queensland or the Norther Territory. They almost seem like somewhere else, not Australia. Lovely photos, especially that first shot.

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    1. Thanks :)
      Little town photos are always interesting, and there are so many within Australia. Lesser towns in some areas and States/Territories. Usually little towns have much to offer the tourist and I always have my camera at hand.

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  8. Replies
    1. I remember it was lovely and very flat. Hugs M x0x

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  9. Who would have thought, a little Italy in Queensland. Those graves are beautiful, stunning.

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    1. Yes, who would have thought, it's for sure I didn't till I was told.

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  10. Wherever they are in the world the Italians do love their ornate graves. Love the first photo Margaret.

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  11. I love that first photo, with the dust hovering behind the tractor and the hills and mountains in the background!

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    1. Taken from the side of the road when we were up there, and it turned out ok.

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