Wednesday, 29 March 2017

The smoke and burn.

On our travels in the Ayr area in Queensland had to stop and take photo of this Australian Scene.
This taken with my phone camera.


Whilst in Ayr many cane farmers were burning their sugar cane.  Burning it leaves less rubbish and gets rid of the unwanted debris, it allows the next crop to be sewn quicker instead of waiting for the sugar companies removal.
Burning of cane has it's rules, don't burn between 10am and 2pm.  Neighbours are to be informed of the pending burn, they are just a couple of rules.

Each morning there was fine black ash covered our vehicle which we left there, if a little breeze it all came off with no harm to the paintwork, going for a drive it came off.  Amazing as Mr. B was concerned about the paintwork.

We set out one evening to see if we could find cane burning, plenty of smoke in the sky, many roads to travel but never found the cane burning but took these photos




41 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. There was no coughing from any of us - the smoke was too far away as most of the sugarcane farms are all together joining each other.

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  2. We're allowed to burn dead branches and leaves from our yards after 4 PM. "After 4 p.m., winds usually calm down and the relative humidity levels are on the increase, both of which reduce the potential for a debris fire or any outdoor open air fire to escape your control." Burning leaves smell great.

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    1. Once we were permitted to burn some of our rubbish in the backyard in a drum.
      Years have passed and it's not allowed now.

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  3. Interesting. Do the fires ever get out of control?
    Beautiful pics;)

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    1. Thanks.
      No, it seems fires don't get out of control, for those cane fires are controlled, permission is needed and conditions apply as when to light the cane.

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    2. As long as it's controlled seems an efficient method.
      YOU have a great day:)

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    3. Yes, they are very careful up that way when burning the sugarcane, pays to be :)
      Thanks re day.

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  4. Very nice photos. I've heard burning the cane also gets rid of any snakes and rodents hiding in there. Good idea to get the next crop sown as soon as possible, can't have the world running out of sugar.

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    1. Thanks River.
      Yes, snakes, rodents as you say and any other nasty creatures.
      It's a huge industry is the cane.

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  5. A quick way. Not sure it is a good way, but it is certainly quick and effective. And yes, perish the thought that we run out of sugar.
    Great photos.

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    1. There was great or is controversy about whether to burn or not to burn the cane fields - it seems in that large area to burn won.
      Thanks.

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  6. They now say the cost of sugar is going to increase because of Debbie, can you imagine like without sugar, I can't because I have a sweet tooth. Thanks for the awesome photos, never been near when the sugar cane is burnt off but of course knew it happened

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    1. I don't have a sweet tooth, can go for years without eating sweet tooth stuff :) but we do need sugar for so many things.

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  7. I love those images, especially the composition of the first photo.

    Kisses

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    1. Thank you, it's not often I come across a scene like the first photo which is rather strange seeing as we have travelled far and wide in Australia.

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  8. Ayr is copping the brunt of "Debbie" now as it has crossed the coastline.
    The amount of rain in the Ayr area is unbelievable so now flooding to be expected.
    Those droughtmaster cattle won't be quite so content at present with the weather
    conditions.
    Seems everyone (well 99.9%) heeded the government and emergency warnings except that utter lunatic shown on TV this morning wind surfing........always a "Nutter"
    in the community. I hope he didn't expect any assistance if he got swept onto any rocks??????????

    Of course there are rules for burning off and God help anyone who does not observe them.....there would be uncontrollable fires the length and breath of the cane producing region.
    Great report, Margaret.
    Colin

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    1. Thank goodness no one has lost their life thus far in the cyclone that was Debbie, it's seems Bowen further south took a far lashing.
      Yes, I did see the footage of the surfer, certainly no sense.
      Many rules and regulations I read about burning of sugar cane...interesting read Colin.

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  9. I thought cane burning had all but ceased. Clearly not, from your photos.

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    1. The photos are proof of the pudding or whatever that saying is Andrew :)

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  10. I didn't grow up near cane fields, but the photos look very much like my childhood region.

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  11. This is a very interesting fact.. I've never been in Australia.. I can travel to Australia in my mind through your blog... thanks for sharing all those small stuffs.. XOXO..

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    1. Thanks krishna :) it is a nice way to travel through others blogs - I too enjoy that.

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  12. One good thing... you got some interesting photos of the smoke.

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    1. Thanks, did try to be better but nearly got lost in the bargain :)

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  13. Interesting, I did not know that they burn them. Must be quite a smoke.

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    1. Yes heaps of smoke upwards and wide spread, though we couldn't smell it until we got close.

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  14. Burning has been banned here since the 1990s - we are not supposed to burn garden rubbish either but some of my elderly neighbours, those that are in their 90s tend to still do it - it is annoying if they burn during the day when I have my washing drying outside.

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    1. That was the thing Rosemary, people burning rubbish in their backyards so pleased we don't have that down here now as it does make the clothes smell of smoke.
      Up north in the Ayr area most of ones washing would be dry in a few hours in all seasons.

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  15. Excelentes paisajes y con mucho esncanto.
    Un abrazo, Margaret.

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  16. being a villager i know the process well as it help to grow new crop in clean fields.
    your phone camera is great to take such wonderful pics.
    smoke adds beauty in the view any how

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    1. Smoke adds a new dimension to a photo, therefore it's different.

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  17. Some good shots. I enjoyed reading.

    Thank you. Love love, Andrew. Bye.

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  18. Interesting to know your ways.
    The photos are great.

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