Wednesday, 26 August 2015

Travelling in Western Australia...

Western Australia is the bigggest State of Australia. It covers one side of this Land from top to bottom.
There are very few towns.

No such thing as 'Fresh Bread' up north.  It's frozen and mostly sold thawed.
Many places (Caravan Parks) there is little or NO TV.
Heaps of places there is no Telephone Service or Internet Services, even as you drive down the road. For km there is isolation.
Fuel is available at Roadhouses placed just in the correct position from the last one. There are no other houses or people other than those who work in them.  
Most people who work in these places (Roadhouses) are from another country. Germany, France, Denmark, Holland, Ireland, England, Asians and a few other countries.  There seems to be hardly any Australians. I believe that most of these people who are young are on working Visas and it's very isolated for them here in the State of Western Australia (WA)


We travel 500 km some days which takes up to 7 hours of driving, stopping for 5 minutes here and there to stretch our legs. We usually leave on such days at 5.30am so that we arrive just after lunch time at our new destination.
Whilst in a town we look around the sites, find out the history if possible, take photos and meet the local people.
One thing that Western Australia has this time of year is Wildflowers.  There are so many kinds it would take a mountain of years to document and photographic them.

Flower below is Sturt Desert Pea

Purple Mulla Mula


Perennial Statice


Not sure of the name of this white flower.

31 comments:

  1. all pretty...the first one a little odd, but chose the right color :O]

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    1. It's very different, and a brilliant colour amongst the red/orange soil..

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  2. Well that is news to me and really news that astounds me.
    People on 457A visas maintaining roadhouses etc on the vast expanses of
    WA. I guess then that these 457A people are all young?
    Great summation of the travel, flora and communication situtation
    in WA - plus the shock of the facts re: persons working.
    What do the local people then do??? Road maintenance, electricity, water haulers,
    airport upkeep (if there is a small airport), stock people who live in the towns, the few shop
    and maybe the local hotel people!!!
    Makes you wonder with the "dole" people????
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Let's call the white flower - Margaret's white shank's dandelion!!!
      Colin

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    2. Oh is it!
      Yes, they are young.
      Some white Australians own or lease the Roadhouses.
      There are no local people near or around the Roadhouses. As I stated, there is nothing.
      In the town down the Western Australian Coast there are people of course, but just nothing in between.
      The road maintenance done by the men employed in the nearest town, 100's of km away. They make a camp near where they are doing the road, stay there doing shift work.
      Generators are used at Roadhouses. . Artesian, or natural springs for water. Sometimes water is piped from other places. Bore water it's not advisable to use for drinking, washing etc. unless it's treated, to a point.
      No airports, there is a landing strip on the road. Really remote Stations might have a landing strip also.
      No Hotels, the Roadhouses may sell liquor, or may not....
      But of course the towns such as Port Hedland has a supermarket, shops, accommodation, and the usual things in towns. The next big town has similar and so on. By looking at the map of Western Australia you might get the idea....

      Those people on the Dole, well, they certainly wouldn't work in these remote places...well most wouldn't.

      Margaret's white shank's dandelion...oh dear, sound ok but shank's pony was working overtime with photos to be taken...

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  3. The perennial statice looks prettier than the purple variety grown in the gardens here, the unknown white flower is lovely.
    Funny to think in this day and age there is still so much open space where no phones or internet are available. Miles and miles of nothing but scenery with an occasional roadhouse.

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    1. You are right about miles and miles of nothing :) but that's Australia...has to be seen to understand.

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  4. They are quite special people who live and work in the outback. The flower photos are very crisp. Good work.

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    1. They indeed are special people, it's not a life for everyone.
      Thanks re flowers, it was very windy when taking them...

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  5. The wild flowers are lovely Margaret, and I especially like the Sturt Desert Pea as it is so unusual in colour and form.
    I must say it does sound very remote in Western Australia - could there be room in that area for some of the thousands of immigrants flooding into Europe?

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    1. It is remote in that particular area Rosemary....there would be room, but they would not survive there. No water, no nothing...
      I heard about the immigrants, so, so many it's sad...

      The flowers are really lovely and today we came across more, all different...

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  6. So delightful to see these unusual flowers. I'll look forward to more shots from Western Australia.

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  7. Margaret I hope it is a great challenge to live in the outback... The flowers are charming and interesting. Travel safely

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    1. It would be a great challenge Gosia. Thank you, we are on the road again..

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  8. Love the wildflowers. One of my sisters-in-law went to the Northern Territory after rare rain and saw lots of wildflowers. She was peeved - because the red centre 'shouldn't be like that'!!!!
    The remote life is certainly not for everyone, and I wonder how long people stay on average.
    I am really enjoying travelling with you. Thank you.

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    1. Ah! Always a flower out somewhere. This time of year it's lovely seeing the wild flowers. Have heard of unexpected rain producing great flowers in the desert.
      Was talking to an Irish couple in Curtain Springs NT, he and his wife had been there for two years, he said it was time to visit family in Ireland and they didn't want to leave Curtain Springs....wow, that was a big statement to make seeing how isolated Curtain Springs is!

      I'm pleased you are enjoying my/our travels...

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  9. The bright red flowers are really unusual. It must be tedious to drive in such remote areas for long distances. At least the roadhouses give you something to look forward to!

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    1. We don't mind driving in the remote areas, we know it's like it is so we must get ourselves mentally ready I suppose. Always something different to see, terrain changes but not much :)

      The Roadhouses are not very flash. They are extremely busy at times, everyone travelling seems to arrive at the same time. To make matters worse at the roadhouses you can't drive off until you pay for your diesel/petrol, it works that way because the next driver can't fill his vehicle up until the first person pays...

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  10. I've never seen a Sturt Desert Pea in real life. Your shots of the wildflowers are lovely.

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    1. They are a lovely colour and trail along the ground, occasionally climbing up onto themselves...thanks re shots...

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  11. You did a great job again Margaret. It is always a pleasure to visit your blog. ;-)

    Greetings from the Netherlands!
    Gert Jan
    www.gertjanhermus.nl

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  12. Lovely series, Margaret, and I especially love your first photo!

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    1. Vibrant colour the Stuart Desert Pea, pretty to see.

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  13. Hello M I am so enjoying your trip. It is like I am there. Thank you so much for sharing my dear friend. xoxo Hug G

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  14. Such beautiful and unique wildflowers has Australia. your photos as stunning.

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  15. Extraordinarily beautiful flowers...beautifully captured.

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