Monday, 13 March 2017

Transporting of Sugarcane, Queensland

Many of the sugarcane farms have train lines so the small trains which are usually ever so long can travel to collect the cut cane to take to the mill.
We saw many mills on our travels but this one was the closest to take a photo of.
Some areas burn sugarcane and some don't burn it.






Here comes the small sugarcane train going to the mill.


The sugarcane train goes forever it seems.


Cut cane


Sugar growing near the graveyard at Ingham, Queensland.


45 comments:

  1. Schöne Bilder von der kleinen Bahn.
    Bei uns sind es Zucker Rüben die im Herbst geerntet werden und zu den Zuckerfabriken gefahren werden.

    Noke

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    1. Thanks.They are small trains indeed.
      So you have sugar growing there too...interesting.

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  2. oh!! that never ending freight train.. as a child I loved to count the cars of freight trains... ha ha

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    1. Good past time to count them because they don't seem to end.

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  3. Replies
    1. Oh yes was much fun travelling around seeing what was going on.

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  4. I love the sight of the wind whipping through mature sugar cane fields. :)

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    1. Was a bit of a breeze about that day, if I remember it was beautiful.

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  5. Fascinating. I've never been around sugar cane, but it seems to be as common a sight there as corn is in our Midwest.
    YOU have a great week!

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    1. Thanks Sandra.
      I expect sugar in that large area in Australia is the same as corn in your midwest.

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  6. Thanks for the interesting post... Now that Hawaii has given up on sugar, I wonder if some of what we get here is from Australia....

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    1. You could well receive some sugar from Australia - will have to Google where most of Australia's sugar goes, but I have a fair idea.

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  7. It's a very big business and there is a lot that happens behind the scenes to ensure the world goes on consuming vast amounts of sugar, while Australia reaps the benefits.

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    1. I believe so Andrew...always pushing forward are the cane growers to get a better deal.

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  8. He had never seen a plantation of sugar cane. The smoke from the chimneys is very attractive in the photos.

    Kisses

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    Replies
    1. It's always interesting to see what happens in other countries in all kinds of things - it certainly educates me much better.

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  9. Replies
    1. You are welcome. Very long, we didn't think it was ever going to finish.

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  10. I saw a documentary about the sugar cane trains which I found interesting, just like this post

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    1. Thanks Jo-Anne - most of us like to learn no matter what age we are.

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  11. Ah - the joys of the seemingly never ending slow sugar trains when they crossed main roads in some of the smaller sugar cane towns in Qld - Nambour at one stage had a crossing on one of the roads off the Bruce Highway which went to the Noosa area.
    I recall way back in travels up in the area of sugar being "king" that the sugar trains were even in the main streets! I guess that thankfully is a thing of the past????????????
    Good report on FNQ industries.
    Colin

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    1. Oops - apologies to the cane growers - sugar is STILL king of the cropping
      fraternity.
      Colin

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    2. Yes, KING indeed Colin.
      Yes, a few sugar cane train lines and are used in the middle of towns, and larger ones. Didn't see any on the Highway, maybe once or twice.

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  12. Really enjoyed this interesting post. Must have been an awesome sight in person.

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  13. Oh boy, it's been years since I've seen a sugarcane train. There's something very charming about them. They almost look like animated characters in children's story books.

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    1. Those trains do looks as you say and every time I saw one I thought as you do.

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  14. I like the look of the cute little sugar train. This got me thinking about how big the sugar industry is, world wide it is one of the most used substances known to man. It's in almost everything.

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    1. Sugar is almost in everything being a natural product. Wonderful really that it can be grown in Australia and so successfully too.

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  15. Too much sugar, but, exquisite photography.

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    1. Ah! That's true, but a little sugar in moderation as everything is ok in my book.

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  16. Interesting pictures. I never realized that Australia has sugar plantations. How sweet it is.

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    1. Sure is sweet, yes a huge industry in the northern area on the east coast inland a bit.

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  17. Replies
    1. The sugarcane mills I presume own the trains Sandra. I read that somewhere.

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  18. Wow!
    what an interesting story to share dear friend.
    i really enjoyed looking all this as here sugarcane are transported through huge trucks

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  19. When my late brother first moved to Mackay he drove the locos for the cane farms. When I lived in Yorkeys Knob...for a time I rented a house among the canefields.

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  20. That is very interesting. Such a LONG train!

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  21. I am not familiar with the sugar cane industry in Australia but in North America it is highly subsidized and the multinational growers are always looking for more handouts.

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  22. Margaret really interesting post thanks for sharing. I have never seen sugar train before

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  23. Interesting post. And the little yellow train looks so lovely.

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  24. You got some great shots here ...

    All the best Jan

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