Wednesday, 8 February 2017

On the way further up north.

Found Cairns Botanical Gardens photo on my iPad!  Remember I thought they had been deleted, well they were but not on the iPad.

Headed further up Far North Queensland in Winter 2016 in the Tropics to a place called Mossman.
On the way there were a few canefields.
Sugarcane was brought to Australia in 1788 on the ships of the First Fleet.  However, growing wasn't successful further south in the beginning.
These photos were taken in the moving vehicle as there was no where to stop on the highway.
The house with a big veranda, the trampoline with net around for the children.







35 comments:

  1. Schöne Bilder alles so schön grün und blauer Himmel,
    bei uns ganz zur Zeit nicht.

    Noke

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    Replies
    1. Won't be long and your spring with arrive. It was winter so one expects it to be green.

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  2. Bloody great photos, I have seen sugarcane while travelling

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Jo-Anne, plenty of it growing in Far North Queensland.

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  3. Certainly good pictures for being from a moving car!

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    Replies
    1. We were not going slow either, so was pleased with result. Sometimes you just can't stop to take a photo for many reasons, so down goes the side window and I shoot.

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  4. Very good photos, to be taken by a vehicle on the move.

    Kisses

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  5. I wouldn't be getting too close to the cane field in the burning period.
    Too many of the really venomous "Joe Blakes" like taking up residence in the
    fields for rodents etc and strangely like sensible creatures high tail it out
    when the torch is applied.
    I'm told the "Joe Blakes" are not in the friendliest of moods when this happens,
    I wonder why ??? ha ha.
    Neat homestead...... funny that the trampoline "cage" is so distant from the house. May be the noise factor????
    Cheers
    Colin

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    Replies
    1. Not all can fields are burnt these days, they are in the Ayr area though.
      The trampoline is where it is because it appears it's the only flat piece of ground.

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  6. Seeing is believing! Well composed photos. Thank you

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  7. It's a wonderful part of our country that region up there. :)

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  8. The children can make all the noise they like on the trampoline at that distance from the house. Everything looks so green.

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    Replies
    1. Winter green I expect.
      The children could certainly yell as much as they like...and laugh. The trampoline is a long way from the house it seems.

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  9. hi Margaret, lovely photos from a moving car. i love the 'queenslanders'. they are very well thought out for ventilation, shade etc. when i see cane fields i always think of snakes. same as rice fields in asia. oh dear :)

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    Replies
    1. Those Queenslaners' are great for sitting on the porch in the shade and breeze if any.
      Snakes galore and killer ones too.

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  10. Replies
    1. Always like to see pictures of nature, it's always fascinating.

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  11. Sometimes it's really difficult to stop the car. These photos are very good, and it's lovely to see the countryside there.

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  12. Replies
    1. It gives an idea what it's like in that part of the world.

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  13. I like the little cabin with all the trees behind it.

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  14. I love large verandas don't you?
    I wonder why the sugarcane didn't originally take.
    You have a great one:)

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    Replies
    1. I do love them when it's very hot as it's good to sit out under.
      Have no idea why sugercane didn't grow down south, could be it wasn't tropical heat.

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  15. What a lovely spot for kids to grow up. Far removed from the harried city life of many.

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  16. Nice looking countryside - and I bet the kids love that trampoline!

    All the best Jan

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  17. Snakes and sugar cane fields go together; harvesting cane is a hazardous job.

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