Wednesday, 8 June 2016

Richmond Gaol, (2) Tasmania

Most of these prisoners stole a piece of bread or some small item back in England, Ireland and Scotland, and were sent to Sydney in New South Wales and Tasmania.
Families often followed if money could be raised for their passage.
Britain wanted to fill the New Land with their subjects.

In the building below at Richmond Gaol back in the early 1800's there were a few small dark rooms to house the prisoners who needed to be shackled.

The photo of the floor with glass, that is a tunnel dug by prisoners who wished to escape.










Prison cells which are dark, no light at all.

42 comments:

  1. I can't imagine how difficult those times must have been. Thanks for the history lessons, warm greetings!

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    1. I can't imagine either what it would have been like back then.

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  2. Such petty crimes with harsh punishment.

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  3. this is so cool. sad and horrible, but cool. I love to see places like this. It help us remind how awful the human race can be :/

    I loved your blog and I'm following you! I would love if you'd hop on my blog and follow me too :)

    xx
    the-not-so-girlygirl.blogspot.com

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    1. Thank you :)
      It's good we have moved on from those times back then..

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  4. It's hard to imagine people being imprisoned in such stark conditions. I would go mad in a cell with no light.

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    1. Dreadful it would have been. I can't imagine being in a small cell with no light either...just horrible conditions.

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  5. You brought these haunting images alive. Appreciate you sharing.

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  6. I hope you are ok in today's evacuation of your city? Sending positive thoughts your way.
    And that tunnel. So much work. Indicative of just how tough conditions were...

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    1. We are fine thanks re floods. No evacuation of city - media get carried away. Few areas, low lying ones people were evacuated just in case. Some people did get their houses flooded unfortunately.
      I expect those men got caught digging the tunnel, don't think it lead anywhere.

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  7. I hope you're high and dry down your way, Margaret. Areas along the eastern coast of parts of the mainland and northern areas of Tasmania sure have been copping it. Take good care and stay safe.

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    1. Yes we are ok thanks Lee. Live on top of a hill that's flatish.
      Went to look at the flooded areas today..
      Thank you.

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  8. Great report as usual - you are excelling yourself.
    Lucky for Launceston that the two river didn't converge at
    Launceston at the same time. The flooding is getting priority
    coverage up here in Brisbane. Lucky you to be on high ground.
    That second river when the flood gates were opened certainly
    rushed down that gorge with a fury. You'd be a "GONER" if trapped in
    its way.
    Hopefully not too many livestock were lost - reports suggest that stock
    were moved to higher ground.
    Mother Nature certainly has given the Pacific Coastline of Australia a lashing
    and drenching. The cost will be in the millions plus!
    We got it up here last Saturday - Heuy was at his full fury.
    Cheers and don't go driving! Not that you would.
    Colin

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    1. Thanks Colin.
      I think there are about 4 rivers than run into one another that causes floods plus rain, though we didn't have a lot.
      Lots of livestock lost unfortunately, plus a couple of men missing still.
      Lots of dollars to repairs or replace in all areas effected.

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  9. I can't think of anything worse than being shackled. I get panicky when the zip on my parka jams! Being unable to get out of anything is the one thing that scares me sweaty. I have never in my life slept inside a sleeping bag.

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    1. Wouldn't be good, wow it would hurt the ankles/legs, wrists/arms.
      Have slept in a sleeping bag many times. We used to go to the snow when younger and sleep in airy log cabins - those where the days :)

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  10. What terrible conditions. There was no human dignity at that time.
    You show great details, thanks for sharing.

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    1. Dreadful to have been a prisoner back then.
      You are welcome.

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  11. Intresting and sad! Prisoners have had terrible conditions those times.

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  12. Margaret it was in the past but what is worse now the world is not nbetter in some pars

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  13. These were great shots. I'd hate to be confined in the dark like that.

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  14. The people must have been desperate, so very hungry to steal a piece of bread ... and then they arrive in Richmond gaol!

    Your series of photo's show this building very well.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thanks.
      No money way back then in many countries, no work, no pay, no clothing or food.

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  15. It is appalling that so very many can support such cruelty in the name of justice. I am ashamed to admit that I was very enthusiastically one of them until our Heavenly Father started letting me see how things look through His eyes, which is rather ironic with my physical eyesight remaining so poor.

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    1. I expect you did what you thought was right at the time.

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  16. Replies
    1. I expect they didn't think it was cruel, well the prisoners would.

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  17. It was pretty draconian wasn't it? I guess we have become at least a little more enlightened.

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    1. Dreadful it must have been - we have come along way these latter years.

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