Monday, 1 February 2016

Great Australian Bight (2)

Great Australian Bight.  In geography, bight has two meanings. A bight can be simply a bend or curve in any geographical feature, usually a coast. Alternatively, the term can refer to a large (and often only slightly receding) bay. It is distinguished from a sound by being shallower. Traditionally, explorers defined a bight as a bay that could be sailed out of on a single tack in a square-rigged sailing vessel, regardless of the direction of the wind (typically meaning the apex of the bight is less than 25 degrees from the edges).

That's the definition of  'Great Australian Bight' for those that asked the question.
So the photos below are of some of the scenery along the Bight.

Whales can be seen at designated area for tourist and it's guaranteed that you will see a whale from June to September.  At the height of the season July/August, over 100 whates can be in the area at one time.
We saw a few way out in the sea.
These whales are Southern Right Whales which come into calf during their winter migration.
The southern right whale spends summer in the far Southern Ocean feeding, probably close to Antarctica.
A link to read (if you wish) about the Southern Right Whale is [ here ]







Swallows.




No whales.


The viewing area for watching the whales.  There is another viewing area the on the other side of that hill.


Mulga Snake, or King Brown snake, or Pilbara Cobra, is a species of venomous snake found in Australia. It is one of the longest venomous snakes in the world and is the second longest in Australia.
We came across this snake not that far from the Nullarbor Roadhouse on the walk to see the Whales in the Great Australian Bight.  (I showed the photo of the snake and Swallows last year)


The cost of seeing the Whales.


52 comments:

  1. Hi Margaret, your photos are beautiful. The swallows are pretty.

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  2. wow these pics are really beautiful ,loved looking at them

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  3. Wow what a great view, I really like your snake but I am afraid of it - you ahve taken a great photo. I would like to see a whale - masterpiece of nature

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  4. Beautiful, and I especially love the water and the swallows!

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  5. To me...charging to see God's creatures is very insulting. Who should I send the irate email to *wink*

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  6. Wow, that is very beautiful and interesting place!

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    1. Could sit and stand for hours to watch the sea, the water is so beautiful.

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  7. Love the swallows Margaret - do they charge that much money just to stand on the wooden platform. I saw whales in Canada but we went out in a boat.

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    1. Yes they do charge those prices Rosemary. Amazing isn't it!
      In a few other areas of Australia where the whales go you catch a boat but they also charge.

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  8. That is a wonderful place with fantastic views !!
    Thanks for sharing your wonderful photos !!
    Greetings

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  9. What amazing views.
    Did you know that the Right whales got their name because they were the right ones to kill? Sigh.

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    1. Oh really, thanks for that information as I had no idea :)

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  10. Your swallows look a lot like our swallows. I'm just glad the snake is exclusive to Australia!

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    1. I'm glad that snake went about it's business without interfering with anyone.

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  11. Those birds are so cute. I'd love to see whales in their native habitat.
    I now know what bight means:)

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    1. The swallows were darting here and there, they certainly don't stay still for long.
      I'm pleased you read what 'bight' means :)

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  12. Take heart Margaret - at least one reader now knows what BIGHT means - Ms Cox.
    Pretty steep prices for the whale watching but I think the fees are put to a good use - protection of the whales from "you know who".
    I reckon you were a bit game with getting that close to that Mulga, King Brown or Pilbara - dead snakes are the only ones that I respect as I have stepped on one and been bitten. It can be the shock that kills maybe quicker than the poison. However all three mentioned by you are MEMBERS of the most venomous snakes CLUB in the World - they mean business. Get out of my hunting zone of else!
    Swallows that I have seen OVERSEAS and in Australia have always had a REMARKABLE RESEMBLANCE!!!!!
    Most informative blog Margaret and splendid photos - that includes the two lovely Aussie swallows - ha ha.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Many people pay that price to see the whales. It's expensive if none are there thought, disappointing. Lovely paths to walk on and safe, also wheelchair friendly for those that need to.

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  13. A lack of whales we see two beautiful swallows

    Kisses

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    1. Yes, lovely to be able to see the swallows and even see the snake, never seen King Brown before.

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  14. I sure saw a few king brown snakes growing up as a kid. Also as a child... I thought the Great Australian "Bight" was so named because it looked like someone had taken a great big "bite" out of the bottom of the country. ;-)

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    1. Yep Monica - like you as a kid I thought that Bight, which I had no idea of how to spell, was actually "BITE" and it does look like some pre-historic monster did take an enormous BITE out of the bottom of Australia. I soon in College (high school) from the Geography Master
      learnt that BIGHT had nothing to do with the Food stuff and that BITE - ha ha.
      Cheers
      Colin

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    2. I thought a shark had taken a bight until I was educated :)

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  15. Ok the water is so blue, and I had no idea what bight meant but I did have an idea where the Great Australian Bight is

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    1. Beautiful sea there Jo-Anne.
      It's good you found out what Bight meant in relation to the Great Australian Bight. They say we learn something each day :)

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  16. They are just alternative names for a King Brown? The water looks very deep.

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    1. I should imagine that water would be very deep especially out to sea a little.
      King Brown snake, the other names would be the correct names because it depends on where you see the King Brown. I know it as the King Brown. Aboriginals might call it something else.

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  17. How blue is that ocean!
    I always tell people it is called a Bight because some one, possibly a giant, took a bite out of the continent before it was fully baked.

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    1. Well that's a very good answer :)
      Very blue..to stand and see the sea is wondrous.

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  18. the color of the ocean is just superb!
    thank you for the discovery of these wonderful places !!

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  19. That sounds wonderful, I'd love to see whales in their natural habitat. However, how do they live in such shallow waters?
    If you've seen "Natural Born Killers" you know Mickey's snake story. Never can I trust a snake! Yet I love the feeling of pythons sliding around my body.

    - Harlynn
    mindyourmadness.blogspot.com

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    1. Wait a cobra snake!? That thing is long alright!! Never would I touch or go near a cobra of any kind. However being a snake tamer would be awesome.

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  20. Great seawatch, and the two of Swallows, beautiful images.

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  21. Waw, nice sights. I am surprised you could take a picture of a snake.

    Greetings,
    Filip

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    1. I was lucky with that snake. Had the camera at hand, just changed the setting and took photos, they all came out clear!

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  22. Hi Margaret, I'm not familiar with those birds. Looking at Bob's comment..swallows?

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  23. thanks for definition dear as i was one of those who had question in mind,pics are fabulous but loved these pair of birds ,want to sit exact like them above and care free lovely

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  24. Wow you were brave to hold the camera still enough to take a deadly snake. Is the road across the Nullarbor so close to the sea or do you have to go down side roads

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    1. Well the snake was going away from us, so that helped. I was rather surprised that the photos came out fairly sharp of the snake, I did expect them to be blurred, must have had the camera on the correct setting in readiness for the whales that were not there.

      The sea is not next to the road, you have to drive down designated driveways to see the sea. A few of these roads have been closed due to the cliffs not being safe.

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