Tuesday, 24 November 2015

Tessellated Pavement, Eaglehawke Neck, Tasmania

Again this month my husband and I headed off to the southern area of our island State of Tasmania for just over one weeks stay at Cambridge about 10km from the State Capital Hobart.  We visited Eaglehawke Neck - see the Location map at the bottom of this post.

Tessellated Pavement, Tasmania.

The most well known example of a tessellated pavement is the Tessellated Pavement that is found at Lufra, Eaglehawk Neck on the Tasman Peninsula of Tasmania. This tesselated pavement consists of a marine platform on the shore of Pirates Bay, Tasmania. This example consists of two types of formations: a pan formation and a loaf formation.
The pan formation is a series of concave depressions in the rock that typically forms beyond the edge of the seashore. This part of the pavement dries out more at low tide than the portion abutting the seashore, allowing salt crystals to develop further; the surface of the "pans" therefore erodes more quickly than the joints, resulting in increasing concavity
The loaf formations occur on the parts of the pavement closer to the seashore, which are immersed in water for longer periods of time. These parts of the pavement do not dry out so much, reducing the level of salt crystallisation. Water, carrying abrasive sand, is typically channelled through the joints, causing them to erode faster than the rest of the pavement, leaving loaf-like structures protruding.
Wikipedia.


The walk to see these pavements is a short one, and you can go down to the sea to have a better look.




Part of Pirates Bay, Eaglehawke Neck, Tasmania.

37 comments:

  1. Very unusual and I do love the view of the ocean.

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  2. Fascinating! It brought to mind the Giants Causeway formations in Northern Ireland. It's amazing what Nature can create.

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    1. I expect there are several places in this world that's similar in certain areas..

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  3. How amazing. And beautiful.
    Tasmania is such a beautiful place.

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  4. Nature doesn't normally produce such symmetry. Amazing.

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    1. Yes it is amazing. There is another area in Tasmania that has similar....must visit and take photos.

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  5. Incredible!
    I looked the area up on "Wiki" to check that rock pattern. The wonders of nature, who would
    have believed that this was all nature's work.
    Thanks for this wonderful phenomenal works of nature.
    Here for o/seas readers:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eaglehawk_Neck

    Congratulations Margaret.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. You are welcome :)
      Thanks for the link - if you wish to know more look at:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessellated_pavement

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    2. I did - you should know me by now.
      Very interesting.
      See you in 2 plus weeks time.
      Cheers
      Colin

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  6. They look like cobblestones to me, nature does a pretty good job.
    Merle.............

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    Replies
    1. Yes, they do look like cobblestones but slippery ones I bet.

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  7. Such a stunning part of the world. You are very fortunate to be so close.

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    1. 3 hours away by car, so that's not too bad seeing Tasmania's roads are not that straight as in many areas of Australia.

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  8. Absolutely incredible...amazing. Nature...it's far more clever than we are.

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  9. Bloody marvelous but have to say if I was to walk on those pavements I would fall I am that type of person

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    1. I wouldn't walk on it either Jo-Anne. There was a couple who were.

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  10. Absolutely fascinating that the ocean can do this. I'd love to see it for myself some day, but for now, this will have to do.

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    Replies
    1. It is amazing how nature does different things, and that we are able to see it..

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  11. I'm afraid that I had to look up tessellated pavement to understand it properly. Quite remarkable as you'd almost swear that it was man made!

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  12. The geology of this tessellated pavement is amazing - how wonderful is nature. The only similarities that I have seen before is the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland.

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    1. So many Irish people migrated to Tasmania as well as convicts...and similar to the Causeway in Northern Island. Have seen photos of that Causeway..

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  13. Hi, Greetings from Malaysia. Just to let you know I am your newest follower. Nature does amazing things. Have a beautiful day!

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  14. Replies
    1. Sure is Linda, very different and not many places in this world have it.

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