Thursday, 8 October 2015

Scenery to Coober Pedy SA

Continued on our way through several towns after Burra SA.
Went via Peterborough and down through some wonderful hills called Horrocoks Pass to Port Augusta.
If you wish to click on the link [ Here ] it takes you to the previous post regarding Port Augusta.
Then onward to Glendambo SA to buy Diesel.
After leaving Port August you get the feel of the isolation, remoteness and to see the flat land of which more was to come.
I must tell you that we were on our way up the middle of Australia.


Not that far from Burra we came across a Wind farm. 


 The above two photos were taken out the window as we moved along.


Behind those hills is Horrocks Pass.  Taken as we moved along.


Came to a Rest Stop with a View.

Near the above photo is The Island Lagoon Tracking Station was the first deep space station to be established outside of the United States, near Woomera, South Australia in November 1960. The land is fairly flat, being hard to imagine unless seen for yourself.

This area was chosen as the Australian government was working with the government of the United Kingdom on rocket and satellite research close by.
The tracking station began as a trailer installation, and was operational in time for the International Geophysical Year of 1957. By the 1960s, the station consisted of permanent buildings and was a major unit in the network. During the American Project Mercury program, it served as station No. 9 in NASA's Manned Space Flight Network.
The station was operated by the Australian Department of Supply and provided support for deep space missions until 22 December 1972.
Subsequent tracking stations built by NASA in Australia were:
  • Carnarvon, Western Australia
  • Muchea, Western Australia
  • Cooby Creek, Queensland
  • Honeysuckle Creek, ACT
  • Orroral Valley, ACT
  • Tidbinbilla, ACT
  • (Information via Wikipedia)
There is a Rest Area.  Island Lagoon is about 155km north from Port Augusta
 

This is Glendambo a town of about 77 to 80 people.


Salt Bush which grows in parts of the desert.

34 comments:

  1. On this occasion the plain, it is the great protagonist for her landscapes.

    In answer to your comment, I want indicate, that the trees that surround to town of Zuheros are olive trees. They produce a delicious oil.

    Kisses

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    1. True.
      I thought they may have been olive trees..these are grown here in Tasmania as well as some areas of Australia, they do well.

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  2. Margaret the landscape is very interestung and so dofferent from Polish. Wind farms are also popular at my place

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    1. A lot of people don't care for wind farms in Australia for various reasons. We have a few in Tasmania..

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  3. You must have a very steady hand and a good road to get those good pictures from the car!

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    1. Well the road was a bit bumpy, then smooth but you may depend when I took the photo we went over a bump, always the way. I took several photos one after the other, so one was bound to be in focus..

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  4. Well done Margaret - informative post with great photo shots of the first stage of the interior of Australia.
    The Burra countryside looks great - I reckon that area got good wheat, and I think I have seen canola
    in the region, harvests.
    Wind farms - the energy of the future - but they can be PRESUMEDLY noisy ?????
    Ah the salt bush and the mulga!!! Wild pig country in most to all areas especially when it is densely thick - not for strollers out on flower picking walkies - unless you like a sudden wild boar attack. Rogue "mickey" bulls also like to hide in the real thick stuff and they are extremely dangerous.
    I have had the experience and have never forgotten it.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Thanks Colin.
      Didn't see any wild boars or such, have seen more towards the east...I think they would starve up the middle, lack of water and food..

      Wind farms and noise... Yes, there is a constant hum.

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  5. I am always amazed at just how flat some of Oz is.
    Lovely captures - and you have a much, much steadier hand than I do.

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    1. Very flat in so many places..
      I don't think I have a real steady hand, but these photos came out well doing 100km as taken..

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  6. loved traipsing along with you. Such great landscapes and skies.

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  7. It was interesting to see what I thought was saltbush growing widely in Canada. South Australia is doing very well with generating electricity from wind and other sustainable methods. It certainly is wide brown land.

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    1. I except many countries have salt bush..
      Lots more brown/red land than we realise Andrew..

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  8. Now this was interesting as I didn't know most of this

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    1. There is so much we don't know about our country, I would not have known if I hadn't travelled it.

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  9. You have some beautiful photos today. When I see these great expanses of land, I feel I get a small insight into people who suffer from agoraphobia - fear of open spaces.

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    1. Thanks.
      Hadn't thought about agoraphobia...but would be difficult for those that suffer with it..

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  10. Great shots from the car and a good pictorial view of the way into the outback. Magic scenery.

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  11. If left unidentified, one could easily think that those pictures were taken somewhere in the western part of the United States--especially Arizona or New Mexico.

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  12. The striped field in the second photo reminds me of the striped rugs almost everyone had in the 70s.
    I have my map of SA open next to me following you along.

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    1. Oh yes, excellent you see that photo that way...you are right :)
      I think we need a map when following anyone who travels, can get our bearings much better that way..

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  13. These are great captures...and from the car, Margaret. Quite impressive!

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    1. Thanks Linda. I took several along the way from the car moving...good camera..

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  14. Bom dia, as fotos são excelentes e revelam a beleza desconhecida onde a natureza ainda manda.
    AG

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  15. Interesting to see the windmills. Typical for my country, The Netherlands.

    Greetings,
    Filip

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    1. You call them windmills and we call them windfarms :)

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  16. Oh M I cannot say it enough....Thank you thank you for sharing this trip with all of us. The history the views the work you are putting into everyone of these post. I am enjoying this so much as I am sure everyone else. HUGS HUGS xoxoxoG

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  17. Always nice to see so beautiful views !!!
    Gorgeous photos !!
    Greetings

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  18. Wow! If I didn't know it existed, I'd say it was a contrived scene for a movie set. :)

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