Friday, 23 October 2015

Climbing Uluru (Ayers Rock)

 Climbing Uluru.

People are discouraged by Uluru's traditional owners to climb the rock, but of course people freely climb it without any problems.  You have to be fit and not suffer from vertigo (dizziness) or any medical condition restricting exercise.
The climb is closed when it's windy at the top, which of course makes sense.
There have been about 35 deaths relating to recreational climbing since records have begun.

Photography of Uluru.

The Anangu (the traditional people the Aboriginals who are in the area) request that visitors do not photograph certain sections of Uluru, for reasons related to traditional Tjukurpa beliefs.
These areas are the sites of gender-linked rituals in question.  The photographic restriction is intended to prevent Anangu from inadvertently violating this taboo by encountering photographs of the forbidden sites in the outside world.      Wikipedia.

Last time I visited Uluru I was taking a photo of one of the sacred sites, now called sensitive sites and my camera broke!  Me being me, I just laughed.

 
Aboriginal myth, perhaps!  There are many.

It is sometimes reported that those who take rocks from the formation with be cursed and suffere misfortune.  There has been many instances where people who removed such rocks attempted to mail them back to various agencies in an attempt to remove the perceived curse.      Wikipedia.



At the base of Uluru.


It's a long way up there.






A closer look.  Different time of day hence the change in colour.


28 comments:

  1. There is a marvelous igneous intrusion like this near Atlanta, GA. They are marvelous wonders.

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  2. Wow, I am impressed that you made it to the top! Great photos. I've wanted to climb it since I was in 3rd grade and My Weekly Reader had a story about Australia.

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    1. Cynthia...no i didn't climb Uluru...
      What part of Australia was that story, i wonder..

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  3. Amazing place.
    Funny about the camera breaking.
    Merle.........

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    1. Was strange seeing it said a 'sacred site'..lucky I had another with me.

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  4. I would love to climb up, it sounds like a bit of an adventure - interesting about your camera!

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    1. Seems a lot of people do the climb with ease, others find it very difficult. The way down is a problem from what I have been told.

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  5. Oh M these are beautiful shots.It looks like quite the climb but I would probably tackle it. I do hope you did not take any rocks:) Hugs xo G

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    1. Thanks.
      No, I didn't take any rocks :) wasn't worth it, I thought!
      Hugs M x0x0x

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  6. It is a beautiful place. I suspect that, even if I could which I couldn't, I wouldn't make that climb out of respect. We don't abseil down churches when all is said and done. Or most of us don't.
    Weird that your camera gave up the ghost at that spot.

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    1. No, we don't normally abseil down churches, but many don't see Uluru like you see it or think of it..
      I will always wonder about that camera, even though I'm not superstitious.

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  7. Good detailed report. I like the "wiki" links for further information for people if inclined to follow up.
    My parents well into their sixties - much to the offspring's surprise climbed the rock!!
    No way with me - up maybe yes in more youthful days, but a helicopter would have to fly in and get me down!
    I think the first commenter is maybe referring to Stone Mountain outside Atlanta, Ga.
    Quite impressive with the Confederate leaders on horses carved into the rock face, General Lee,
    Jefferson Davis and Stonewall Jackson.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Welcome back and I trust all went well for you whilst away.
      Did you parents manage that! Well I never! I suppose if you are fit, why not!
      Yes, I'm familiar with the carvings in the rocks over there-up there and over..

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  8. It's such a beautiful rock, from any angle, in any light.
    I really must get there one day and do the climb before I get too old.

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  9. What a stunning contrast between the red rock and blue sky.

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  10. Very different views in different times of day. Amazing. And quite a climb!

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  11. I visited Ayres Rock (as it was known back then) some 30 years ago and climbed to the top. Back then it was encouraged for all. It was pretty amazing, very steep in some parts with very limited railing. Looks like there is a lot more now. I don't think I would climb it now, given that it is so discouraged.

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    1. Gosh, I bet it was very different 30 years ago to enter the National Park than it is today.
      How great that you climbed...good on you.

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