Thursday, 17 September 2015

Karlu Karlu, (Devils Marbles) NT

Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles Conservation Reserve is about 105km (65mile) from Tennant Creek, NT

The Devils Marbles is a cultural and spirtual signifacne to the traditional Aboriginal owners of the land, and the reserve protects one of the oldest religious sites in the world as well as the natural rock formations found there.

Karlu Karlu is the local Aboriginal term for both the rock features and the surround area.  The Aboriginal term translates as round boulders.

The origin of the English name for the same boulders is the following quote:
   
This is the Devil's country, he's even emptied his bag of marbles around the place! -
John Ross, Australian Overland Telegraph Line expedition, 1870.

Some of the information is from Wikipedia.

At the Reserve there is a Free Camp which means Motor Homes, Caravans can park there for Free.
After driving and seeing 'flat' country the Devils Marbles was something different to look at.

It's amazing how in the middle of desert there are natures boulders.









31 comments:

  1. eroded igneous intrusion can make the neatest natural curiosities. There are a couple of cool examples near where I used to live (El Paso, Texas). City of Rocks, and Hueco Tanks. Cool places to visit.

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  2. Replies
    1. Some of them are balanced just....it's amazing how they just stay there.

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  3. Quite unique formations.
    Obviously earth tremors are not prevelent in this region.
    I suppose the sacred site is well patrolled by aboriginal rangers/police
    to maintain the spirituality of the site for the aboriginal custodians.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    Replies
    1. A Ranger must come around at some stage, or someone does to empty the rubbish bins.

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  4. Oh I really like those rocks M it is fascinating how they ended up that way. Hug G xo

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    1. There is just a heap there in that one spot, then flat ground/earth for as far as the eye can see..Hugs M xox

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  5. I like the look of these I had not heard of these rocks before

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    1. Oh, you hadn't...thought your parents may have told you when they travelled...but maybe they didn't go that way...

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  6. That'd be a hefty game of marbles, herculean, even!! Fabulous photos, Janice. :)

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  7. They do look amazing. And Lee is right about the photos...

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  8. Those rocks are huge, and what a great observation and name for them.

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  9. These rocks have great visual appeal.
    It is curious contrast, of these stones, with the desert .

    Kisses

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    Replies
    1. Oh gosh yes, that's why it is unusual to see such rock in that vast area.

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  10. I've always found the name intriguing. The stories that go along with naming natural wonders are sometimes even more interesting than the thing itself.

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  11. *snap* I saw the devil's marbles today on a calendar. I was at the newsagent checking out calendars for 2016. Usually I leave it too late and all the good ones are gone :( so this time I got in early, because I'd already missed my bus and had a half hour to to wait.
    I like the marbles, I've never seen them in person, but they're certainly amazing.

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    1. Well I never! Amazing that is. But pleased you have got in early for your calander.

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  12. Margaret, I love visiting your site. Each time is like a mini vacation right at my desk!

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  13. Replies
    1. Certainly was good to see as they the rocks appear out of nowhere.

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  14. These rocks are lovely, Margaret. Thanks so much for sharing.

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  15. Seems in my absence I have missed many of your posts. Loving having time to go back through them.

    I remember camping alongside the Devil's Marbles as a teenager whilst doing an outback tour. Great memories.

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