Wednesday, 29 July 2015

Tropical Flowers

Frangipani is blooming here in the Top End of Australia.  They grow to about 5 to 6 meter high and don't burn unless there is extreme heat.  The most common colour is white with yellow centre.

The second photo I have no idea what flower it is.  Both photos were taken at Government House in Darwin.




40 comments:

  1. Don't you just love the fragrance of the frangipani when you first get a whiff.
    The red blooms remind me of a hibiscus - they grow like frangipanis profusely
    up here and the further you go north they are everywhere!
    The scent of the frangipani at tropical resort locations can at times be
    overwhelming.
    Keep "truckin' " - pity about Shanks?
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Wonderful perfume. A few places had a frangipani tree that we have visited often in the Main Street or in people's gardens, not that much can be grown in most places.
      Shanks's pony, oh well, got left behind, maybe catching up!

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  2. Lovely. The second is a complete mystery to me though. The petals look like leaves...

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    1. Yes they do look like leaves. Even my husband the 'Expert' doesn't know. I suppose we will always wonder when we look at the photo..

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  3. They are a wonderful flower. The even grow here in Melbourne if growing in front of a north facing brick wall.

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    1. That's good they grow in Melbourne..I recall a few people have tried in. Certain areas of Tasmania in a warm sheltered area with success but of course the plant didn't grow it's to its full height.

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  4. Every time I see a frangipani it makes me think of tropical islands.

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  5. Nothing like the smell of frangipani (we call it plumeria.) :)

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    1. Plumeria!
      Yes they call frangipanis, Plumeria in Guam.
      Even the hotel I stayed in there was called " The Plumeria".

      I found some old photos of that red blossom from my old
      PNG collection - they were the same looking blooms as in the
      Lae Botanical Gardens and the war cemetery there.
      I suspect Diane will know their name from her visits to Lae.
      Colin

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    2. Thanks Colin..
      Often plants in different parts of the world are called by different names...

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  6. Oh really, that's interesting...thanks for telling me that :)

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  7. Margaret I have never seen frangipani what a highand fantastrc flower, Thanks for sharing..

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    1. Rather a perfumed scent of which you like or you don't..you are welcome.

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  8. I love plumeria Margaret. To me they are the very essence of a tropical garden. I have a small one growing indoors under a velux window which it loves. The closest it will ever get to Hawaii, Guam or Darwin, but it seems happy enough.

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    1. You never know you might trsvel to one of those places...well done with your Frangipani...green fingers :)

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    2. I've been to Hawaii a couple of times but my poor plumeria has only ever lived in the UK!

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  9. The Frangipani is just beautiful - I looked on Google and did come across an image of the pink flower, but sadly it gave no name.

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    1. Thank you for looking Rosemary...oneday i will find out what's it's called..

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  10. I fully understand it, but it is still hard for me to get used to the fact that the tropics are to the north for you-all down there.

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    1. Yes, hard to wrap your head around that. Only part of Australia is in the tropics.

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  11. Those tropical flowers are always special, and your pictures are very clear and beautiful.

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    1. Thank you. I had frangipani in my Wedding bouquet.

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  12. It's also hard for me to grasp, that your tropics are northern, but it makes sense, once one thinks about it. What a beautiful flower! How are you spending your time up north there? Are there crocs?

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    1. I'm used to northern tropics..
      we are out most afternoons when in a town looking at the shops, scenery, houses or sitting in the shade if not too hot outside, otherwise in the caravan with A/C on.
      Yes there are crocs in many places but haven't seen any as yet..

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  13. I love frangipani. I've tried to grow one in three different states, but never been successful. I've given up and now just admire them in other people's gardens.
    No idea what the pink flower is. It looks as if the tiny white centre is the flower while the pink parts are bracts, similar to bouganvillea.

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    1. Could be related to a boganvillea...a few frangipani's blooming here in Kununurra, just white ones..

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  14. I've never seen a frangipani in person. Your photo is lovely. Wish I had smellavision!

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    1. Wouldn't that be good if we could virtually smell!

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  15. Margaret.
    I think "River" may have nailed this plant - it does have similarities to the bouganvillea.
    Colin

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    1. River could be indeed correct. Will look up varities of Bougainvillea...

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  16. Frangipanis are such beautiful flowers. If only we could smell them as well as see them in your photos!

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