Monday, 15 June 2015

Coles Bay, Tasmania, Australia.

Coles Bay on the East Coast of Tasmania is a small village on the edge of the Freycinet National Park.  The Bay has a small beach and the water can get rough in the blink of an eye.  Once years ago we camped there, these days it's very different, one wouldn't know that you were in the same place..  Beach Access is through the bush because the vegetation has grown back. A Parks Pass is required which we have.  The day we were there it was very windy and cold.
We drove up the hills after seeing the Hazards from a distance, and we were going to walk to the lookout to see Wine Glass Bay, but due to the bad weather plus there was nowhere to leave the caravan we didn't.
There are tours to wine glass bay, the bay being shaped like a wine glass, there are dolphins and whales along with other sea creatures to see if one takes the cruise to wine glass bay.

Coles Bay was the first place in the World to Ban plastic shopping bags in April 2003.



Part of Oyster Bay


The Hazards are a rugged mountain chain in the Freycinet National Park.  These Hazards are said to be named after a local whaler, African-American Captain Richard Hazard.
The rocks are made of granite, Orthoclase, a pink feldspar, gives the mountains their pink tint, but not the day I took photos.


Part of one of the Hazards


The narrow road back down, it's here we turned around with the caravan.


Love this Australian/Tasmanian tree.


The Boat sheds at Coles Bay.  Lots of Chinese tourist about all taking many photos like me.


34 comments:

  1. Well as I write this in the UK it's still Sunday afternoon ...

    Love your photo's and interesting to read.

    Thank you

    All the best Jan

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  2. Margaret I love your trees they are completely different from European ones.. The bay looks fantastic..

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    1. Very different trees to what you have shown us on your blog..

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  3. This is so gorgeous place ! Thanks for sharing your views !!
    Greetings

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  4. This looks my kind of place - a little bit rugged, some mountains, and off the beaten track.
    Do you know the name of the tree? the bark looks similar to our Eucalyptus trees.

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    1. Yes Rosemary, it's a eucalyptus tree, lots of them there.
      Lots of walking tracks there....it's a very popular place all year a round.

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  5. The mountains are stunning Margaret. And that tree bark is like an impressionist painting! Lucky you having that on your home island.

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    1. They are beautiful and different..
      Our trees are lovely, especially the eucalyptus ones...

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  6. An ordeal to get to this fantastic place. It has returned with great pictures and most importantly , without accident on the way , despite its danger

    Kisses

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    Replies
    1. Tasmania in many places is like what you see in the photos.

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  7. Interesting report - I think I have seen food and wine labels with Oyster Bay on them.
    I therefore presume (and one should never presume) that this area is quite productive.

    I wouldn't have that blue gum tree within falling radius of my home.
    Beautiful to see in paddocks - foolhardy to have in close proximity to homes.
    Cheer
    Colin (From a very miserable rainy morning!)

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    1. Oyster Bay wines come from New Zealand.

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    2. Yes Diane - I belately thought so and checked today at the Bottle Shop in Ann Street.
      Colin

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    3. A Tasmanian wine is Great Oyster Bay...you may have found it in your research.
      Trees near homes can be dangerous especially tall ones...

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  8. This is a beautiful part of Tasmania. I remember climbing up to view Wineglass Bay it was a good climb. Bad luck about the weather and parking facilities.

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    1. There is always another day and time Diane,,,in the future if we both can climb :)

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  9. What lovely photos and that tree is unlike any I have ever seen.

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    1. Thanks. We have a lot of lovely trees like that one..

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  10. Oh what a lovely place, I think more places need to ban plastic shopping bags, I don't use them I always take my own.

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    1. Plastic shopping bags are banned here Jo-Anne..

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  11. Yes, the weather does not look so great but I can see the pink hue in the rocks. The tree is simply splendid.

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    1. There is a pink nice tinge in the photos even though I didn't see it in reality..

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  12. Thanks for the map of Tassie - good to place these landmarks in context. PS. I don't think Wine Talk does have any Tassie wines - but I'd sure like to try some. ;-)

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    1. You are welcome re map. I thought not long ago that some people might not know where the places were that I was posting about....it makes it easier for the reader...
      You will have to try and find some Tassie wines...expensive...

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  13. Would the Hazards be one of Taz's favorite places to hang out? (Come one now. You should have known that I would have to make some mention of him somewhere down the line.)

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    1. Definitely. Somewhere in that bush one would find Taz!

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  14. I would like to visit Tasmania and that park with the scenic beauty your photos show. The map is a nice touch, thanks for adding it.

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  15. Such a beautiful area, and I wouldn't mind taking that cruise to see dolphins and whales.
    Banning plastic grocery bags hasn't turned out to be such a great idea. The "green" bags that replaced them soon got to be a nuisance: people didn't keep them clean, people forgot to bring them and had to buy more etc. Then the store-branded plastic bags became available and people bought them for their groceries, but didn't reuse them just bought more every time they shopped so we still have the environmental problem of thrown away bags, but the stores are making more money.

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    1. The plastic bags from other shops break down a different way and much quicker. Here in Tasmania plastic shopping bags as in supermarket ones are banned for the whole of the State. The supermarkets 'sell' those plastic bags that break down quicker, but get richer because several people as you say forget their bags....we are used to it now and don't leave our legal bags in the vehicle...be different when we travel soon to the Big Island...

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  16. I enlarged the map but still can't make out place names except for Hobart and Launceston, so don't know where Coles Bay is.

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    1. River, Over on the right of the map you will see Great Oyster Bay...just the right of that and up a bit....is Coles Bay....i have market black on the map of the trip we did in that area...hope you can find it...

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