Tuesday, 17 March 2015

Happy St. Patrick's Day

St. Patrick's Day is celebrated in many areas of Tasmania due to so many past and present immigrants from Ireland including many of my ancestors at the time of the potato famine in Ireland.



Little is known of Patrick's early life, though it is known that he was born in Roman Britain in the fourth century, into a wealthy Romano-British family. His father was a deacon and his grandfather was a priest in the Christian church. At the age of sixteen, he was kidnapped by Irish raiders and taken captive to Ireland as a slave.  It is believed he was held somewhere on the west coast of Ireland, possibly Mayo, but the exact location is unknown. According to his Confession, he was told by God in a dream to flee from captivity to the coast, where he would board a ship and return to Britain. Upon returning, he quickly joined the Church in Auxerre in Gaul and studied to become a priest.

According to legend, Saint Patrick used the three-leaved shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity to Irish pagans.
In 432, he again said that he was called back to Ireland, though as a bishop, to Christianize the Irish from their native polytheism. Irish folklore tells that one of his teaching methods included using the shamrock to explain the Christian doctrine of the Trinity to the Irish people. After nearly thirty years of evangelism, he died on 17 March 461, and according to tradition, was buried at Downpatrick. Although there were other more successful missions to Ireland from Rome, Patrick endured as the principal champion of Irish Christianity and is held in esteem in the Irish church.


Just a little something I made that happens to be of Irish Origin.

25 comments:

  1. How interesting, concerning the history of St. Patrick. I wonder what he did that gained him sainthood from the church. When I think of Ireland I think of red hair and whiskey and moors and sheep and drinking and more drinking and tempers and potatoes. In our country, the Irish fleeing conditions in their native country landed in New York to direct inscription into the northern army during the civil war. Thousands upon thousands of off the boat Irish were killed in the civil war.

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    1. He supposedly kept the snakes away..
      I was wondering about Americas Irish immigrants....I know they like a good time plus they have a wicked sense of humour.

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  2. So few, myself included, know anything about him. I know more now, thanks.

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    1. You are welcome. I had a small book about him as we were given that at school..

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  3. As one of the most popular personages of the Emerald Green Isle, he sure must have been something to have all these parades in honour of him?
    I looked forward as a kid in Moree as Paddy's day arrived - the Catholic school kids got a holiday and the "Prods" at the State school, didn't. Would cause quite a rumpus in friendships - ha ha.
    In the hospitality industry - especially bar work - the Irish are marvels. They can charm ( the femme brigade) and both male and female can tell some of the most outlandish stories.

    And what a Godsend the Irish are when it comes to sayings!!! I love this one - "That man (or woman) would talk the teeth out of a saw". And when you think about it, have you ever come across a quiet Irish person???
    I'm very proud of my 1/4 Irish heritage.
    Cheers
    Colin

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    1. Sounds a good St. Patrick's Day in Moree then...I don't remember having a holiday from school on this day.
      No never have I come across a quiet Irish person...I'm more Irish than English..

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  4. Hee, hee... I like the quote about butter and whisky. :-)

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  5. Having no Irish blood I know very little of him, but the beer fairy's is from Ireland and Italy way back, a fighting combination that is.
    Merle................

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    1. Never heard of the beer fairys, will look that up..

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  6. So nice and interesting personality. I have watched a video abiout him wioth my students.

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  7. I found this interesting I have been thinking about a post about St Patrick myself today

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    1. Will wonder over and see what you have written..

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  8. 52 percent of my genes are Irish, though I don't know why they left Ireland for America.

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    1. Quite simple Adam - they aspired to a better life. The Potato famine etc had a lot to do with it,
      plus the overlords of the British establishment.
      My family heritage of 25% left for this reason in the 1840's.
      I am pleased to say that all did exceptionally well here and they also came steerage - that is cattle class or lower!!!
      Colin

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  9. The quote about butter and whisky made me smile. Happy St. Patrick's Day. :)

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    1. Thanks Linda...Happy St. Patrick's Day to you too..

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  10. That was very educational. I had no idea about his origins. Many thanks!

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    1. You are welcome. I don't often do this type of thing, but it's also interesting for me too.

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  11. I remember the big St. Patrick's Day parades that I saw when we stayed in Florida, I was really surprised as they seemed to celebrate the day more than they do in Ireland itself.

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    1. Really, that's interesting Rosemary. We used to wear a Green on our school blazer.

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  12. I always wonder what a saint would think about the way his name day is celebrated, with green beer, parades, etc. Sadly in the US it becomes a day to drink way too much green beer!

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  13. Oh gosh....we don't go to that extent down here, well not yet. Would be interesting to know the answer...

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